Allegations of wanton damage, injury and destruction of property are serious. Property damage that people view as a joke or as a harmless way to get revenge against someone else is a crime.

Police take property crimes seriously and so should you. Depending on the allegations, the charges could range from misdemeanor charges to felonies. Anyone accused of these crimes must address them before they get out of control.

There are things people often think are harmless. It could be egging someone’s house, keying a car or graffiti. The damage could result in serious allegations that could lead to serious problems.

The charges could range from misdemeanors to felonies

Property damage crimes are some of the most common allegations in North Carolina. People accused of damaging, injuring or destroying someone’s property often find themselves in court trying to defend their rights. Convictions can be serious.

If there is evidence that you intentionally damaged or destroyed someone else’s property, you could be facing misdemeanor or felony charges.

Property damage charges can stem from a variety of property damage, including:

  • Damaging churches, fences, houses or walls.
  • Damaging/defacing bridges, public buildings, facilities or landmarks.
  • Desecrating graves or human remains.
  • Disorderly conduct in public buildings or facilities.
  • Graffiti or vandalism to property.
  • Injury to crops, land and trees.
  • Willfully or negligently setting fire to brush, fields, grass or woods.

Property damage can lead to serious problems

Your punishment will depend on a variety of things. How much damage was there? Are you a repeat offender? What was damaged?

The allegations and crime might seem minor, but the consequences are serious. If that is the case, you might have legal protections. That could include getting charges reduced or dropped. If that is possible, it could limit the lasting problems.